Titanium: A new release and more

Derrek on the EZ-Sport recumbent Titanium 1.01 was released recently. The new release include includes a README with clearer instructions on how to install Titanium if you are not already familiar with installing modules from CPAN.

Initial feedback on Titanium has been positive. A couple recent quotes from users: “Titanium is much, much simpler [than Catalyst] and has the advantages that entails.” 1, “CGI::Appplication and Titanium (including modules like HTML::Template and HTML::FillInForm) are simple to use, work with all of the authentication stuff that I interface with, and scale perfectly for the number of users that I typically have.” 2. Simplicity is a goal of Titanium and our feedback confirms our success with it.

Jaldhar Vyas has also made important contributions to making it easier to get going with Titanium. He has packaged Titanium for Ubuntu, appearing first in the upcoming Jaunty Jackalope release. He also released a new version of Module::Starter::Plugin::CGIApp, which includes a “titanium-starter” script used to start Titanium projects. This modules comes as a part of installing Titanium and its dependencies.

To test the performance of Titanium, I made a simple benchmark to compare it with some other Perl systems in vanilla CGI. It confirmed what I already knew:Titanium runs fine in vanilla CGI as well as scaling up persistent environments like FastCGI and mod_perl.

When the results first came out, HTTP::Engine had by far the worst results— unacceptable performance for vanilla CGI. But soon afterwards the developers embarked on a successful effort to improve the performance in vanilla CGI. In just a few days time, they had a version that benchmarked nearly 10x faster, while still keeping all the essential features. This is the philosophy that CGI::Application and Titanium have always had— we provide the essential features you need with low overhead.

To help out new users get started with this kind of web development, Mark Rajcok created a CGI::Application Tutorial and Jumpstart Application. He used CGI::Application and some plugins to create a solution much like Titanium that performs well in a typical shared hosting environments. He includes a demp, so you can see test the performance for yourself. Mark is another person who appreciates the benefits of vanilla CGI.

With this positive initial feedback I plan to continue my work on making Titanium even easier to install by shipping all of its dependencies with it.

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